Generally, from Kelvin’s point of view, if you’re not authorized, you should be there.

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        Kelvin approached the building. It had one obvious entrance: the front door. He checked for any back doors, but there were none. He shrugged, and walked toward the door. He was about to open it, when he heard a voice in his ear.
        “Hey, what are you doing there?”
        Kelvin spun around, ready to confront whoever was speaking to him. There was no one there. He frowned, and looked around. Then he heard the voice again.
        “Interesting. So, why does it need repair?”
        After a moment, he realized what was happening. He was hearing Charles though the communication device. He didn’t recognize the voice, because it was being distorted slightly by the device.
        “I probably don’t want that in my ear this whole time,” thought Kelvin, and turned the device off.
        Now that he was not distracted by Charles and Dominica, he entered the building. It had not changed in the ten or so minutes since he had last seen it. He went to one of the side doors in the entrance room, and opened it. Nothing happened. He looked into the room beyond. It was not, as he had expected, actually a room. It was instead a hallway, lined with doors. At the end of the hallway was another door, with two soldiers standing on either side of it. Kelvin walked down the hallway to the nearest door, and opened it. Inside was a clerk sitting at a desk, doing something that involved staring at a single piece of paper for several minutes. Assured that the clerk was of no interest, Kelvin continued down the hallway. The other rooms contained similar desks and similar clerks.
        After checking every room, Kelvin came to the final door. As he neared it, he saw that it was marked, “Authorized Personnel Only”.
        “Now we’re getting somewhere.
        Kelvin opened the door cautiously, acutely aware of the soldiers not a foot away from on either side. They made no attempt to stop him as he walked through the door.
        The door had lead on to another hallway. This one was also lined with doors, each door had a plaque next to it which identified it. The plaques were too small to read at a distance. Occasionally, a soldier would walk down the hallway.

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